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TRAVEL

Hitachi Furyumono -Masterful Art of the Common People-

TRAVEL 2017 30 mins Episode(s): 1 english Japanese
The Hitachi Furyumono is both an important tangible and intangible folk cultural property of Japan. It was also recognized as one of UNESCO`s Intangible Cultural Assets in 2009. It`s origins date back to the Edo era, when the parishioners of Kamine Shrine dedicated a float. Since then, the colorful float carrying dancing mechanical dolls has been the highlight of the festival. We will take a look at the preparation process of the festival, as well as its history and charms!

Part of "Festivals of Japan - Season 1".

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